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Introduction: Hope Set on Grace — 1 Peter

March 15, 2020

Hope is not wishful thinking. There’s a lot of wishful thinking going on, but reality (including the reality of a pandemic), is a wishful-thinking killer.  And death is the ultimate reality check.
If there is no control over anything that happens in life, there is no hope.

You do You

For some folks (we can call them wishful thinkers), “you do you” seems to involve living in denial about the diligence, effort and resourcefulness required to flourish in life. Their preference seems to be, “I only want to do what I want to do.” Irrespective of the realities of life.
Not unlike the little girl who wants to lick the railing in a “viral” video.
For other folks (we might call them over-thinkers or over-worriers), “you do you” seems to involve trying to be as energetic, diligence and resourceful as possible in order to flourish in life.
At all costs.
Not unlike the folks who find themselves fighting over toilet paper.
But no matter what they do, it is never enough to have control over life’s consequences. (A recent academic article highlighted the frustrations of perfectionism being experienced be millenniels and Gen-Z.)
There experience seems to be, “I can’t seem to do enough.”

Navigating Reality

Navigating reality, then, often seems to involve our attempts to find a middle ground between being disconnected from reality (by making decisions the reflect little more than wishful thinking), and being disappointed by reality (by [re]discovering, much to our dismay, that we are not in control).

Worldview # 1: A Hopeless Reality

At the end of the day, navigating reality is meaningless and pointless if, in our view of the world, there is no God. That means there is no creation, no design of the universe (or us), no moral truth, and no purpose in life. Only dread: the existential angst that comes with concluding that all is meaningless (see Ecclesiastes 1).

Worldview # 2: Reality Rediscovered

Pandemics get our attention. In response to the struggles and sufferings that we experience in life, we find ourselves wondering if there is meaning in life. Is there a God? Is there hope? Why is this happening? Where/how can I find something more in life than this pitiful existence?
The Bible offers an alternative worldview. One that actually corresponds better with reality than Worldview # 1. The Bible explains that there is indeed a Creator, a Designer of the universe, and a moral Truthgiver. It is the story of creation, rebellion against the Creator, and a pathway to redemption from the consequences of that rebellion. Creation. Fall. Redemption.
In the Bible we find the one Person in history how navigated reality perfectly. No wishful thinking. No over-thinking. Just simple obedience to God, in a way that none of us have ever done, or could do, or could expect to do.

1 Peter: Hope I the Face of Suffering

And that’s where hope comes in. Because even as we struggle with the realities of life … health issue, job and financial issues, family and social crises, loneliness or depression, etc … there is hope.
That’s the message of Peter the Apostle’s first letter in the Bible. He is writing to followers of Christ (“elect exiles of the Dispersion”) spread throughout the area we know today as Asia Minor. As Peter writes to them, he acknowledges their suffering. They are grieved by various trials, accused of doing evil, suffering unjustly, and essentially experiencing a “fiery trial.”
As he writes to them, he reminds them of the hope that comes from their relationship to God through faith.
We need that message. Especially today.

Babel / Babyl

September 6, 2019
Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church Lesson Six

Babel / Babyl

  1. Quick Review
    1. God Revealing Himself (Edenic Covenant; Adamic Covenant; Noahic Covenant)
    1. Consequences of Ignoring Who God Is
      1. Expulsion from the Garden / Curses
      1. The Flood
    1. Pattern: The Cycle of Judgment and Mercy
      1. Revelation/Warning; Sin; Suffering; Repentance; Forgiveness; Peace; Wandering … Warning
  2. The Dispersion and Dominion (Cultural) Mandate
    1. Adam and Eve, Genesis 1:26-28
    1. Noah, Genesis 9:1
    1. Table of Nations, Genesis 10
      1. Willing Obedience?
      1. Conflict with Genesis 11:1
  3. Discussion Questions:
    1. How can Genesis 11:1 be understood in view of Genesis 10:5,20,31-32?
    1. What was the sin of the Settlers of Shinar (Genesis 11:4)?
    1. What can we learn from the following terminology in Genesis 11:5?
      1. “Children of man”?
      1. “The LORD came down to see?”
    1. What is God’s Response in Genesis 11:6-8 to:
      1. One people, one language
      1. Globalism / “world peace”
    1. The Genesis 11:6-8 Restraints
      1. Punishment or Blessing?
      1. Judgment or Mercy?
      1. Permanent or Temporary?
  4. Genesis 10 and 11 in the New Testament
    1. The Great Commission at Matthew 28:18-19: All authority in heaven and on earth
    1. Acts 8 (Ethiopian eunuch); Acts 9 (Saul of Tarsus) Acts 10 (Cornelius)
    1. The song of Revelation 5:9
    1. The acclamation of Revelation 7:10
  5. Final thoughts / comments / questions
  6. Closing prayer: Psalm 150

Climate Change and Global Catastrophe

August 11, 2019
Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church Lesson Five

Climate Change and Global Catastrophe

  1. Introduction: General and Special Revelation, and Infallibility
  2. Opening Discussion # 1 (Thought Provoker): What are some criticisms of the biblical account of the Flood that are often made?
  3. Opening Discussion # 2 (Thought Provoker): Why is the Flood story important to believers?
  4. Opening Discussion # 3 (Memory Jogger): What changed after the Flood?
  5. Biblical Description of the Flood (Special Revelation)        
    1. Prompted by human wickedness (Genesis 6:5-7)
    1. All the Mountains Were Covered: Genesis 7:18-24; Genesis 8:1-5
    1. The Ark Was a Huge Vessel 
    1. Human Population was Global: Genesis 6:1, 11-12
    1. All Humans (Except Noah and Family) were Killed: Genesis 7:21, 9:1
    1. All Air-Breathing Land Animals were Killed: Genesis 6:17; Gen. 9:16
    1. The Flood was Cataclysmic, not just Large
    1. God’s Promise and the Rainbow: Genesis 8:21; Genesis 9:8-17
    1. Year Long Stay in the Ark: Genesis 8:9, 14
    1. Global Devastation: Genesis 6:13; Isaiah 54:9; 2 Peter 3:5-7
    1. New Testament Affirmations (see above)
  6. Geological and Historical Corroboration (General Revelation)
  7. Discussion # 4: What is meant when we say Noah built the ark “by faith”? (Hebrews 11:7)
  8. Noah, Faith and the Gospel
  9. Jesus is Greater: Jesus is the Last Adam (1 Cor 15: 45); the Greater Noah (1 Pet 3: 20-21); the Greater Abraham (John 8: 58); The Greatest Prophet (Acts 3: 22-23); the Highest High Priest (to whom Levi paid a tithe; Heb 7: 7-9); and David’s Greater Son (Matt 22: 45).
  10. Conclusion / Closing Prayer: Psalm 33:6–9

Who Are You?

March 22, 2020
Who Are You?

Who are you? When you look in the mirror, who/what do you see?
I’m reminded of the Caterpillar in Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland. “Who are you?” said the Caterpillar. Alice replied, rather shyly, “I – I hardly know, sir, just at the present …”
Identity has become fluid in our culture. At least, there is certainly an all-out effort to make it so. The traditional demographic markers of identity – name, sex, life cycle, family situation, locus/citizenship – are, it seems, all up for grabs.
For many (men in particular, it seems), identity has much (everything?) to do with what you do. Or have done. Your career, your job, your trade skills.
The reality is that when we think about someone, and who they are, we think a lot about their character. Their reliable habits, their apparent motivations and their preferences.
In 1 Peter 1:1-3, Peter identifies himself based on his relationship with Jesus Christ. In fact, his very name is actually the nickname given to him by Jesus … Simon (or Simeon) bar Jonah, came to be know as Simon Peter, or just, Peter. And his entire life after he became an apostle was connected in some way with Jesus. We see this in the Gospels, and in the first 15 chapters of the book of Acts.
Those who are familiar with Peter’s story, will tell you that he was a complex, passionate, impulsive follower Christ … known for both is denials of Christ and his declarations about Christ’s identity as the Son of God.
Peter understood the notion of “election,” that is, chosen by God. He was called … that is, chosen by Christ … to be a disciple (John 1:37), and eventually an evangelist (Matt 4:18-19), and the first among the apostles (Matt 10:1-2). Even his declaration of Christ’s identity at Matt 16:13-20 was the result of God’s revelation to Peter.
Our identity – who we are, especially in terms of character – become clearer in times of adversity. Are we primarily abiding in homes (shelter in place, or otherwise abiding in houses and apartments), or do we abide in Christ?
This lesson explores these questions. Who are you?

Misogyny and Patriarchy

August 2, 2019
Old Testament Survey

           Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church

           
            Lesson Four

         Misogyny and Patriarchy

1.       Introduction: Thinking about thinking about God’s Word (What are we doing here?)

           a.        Magisterial Misuse of Reason (See Isaiah 55:8–9; Romans 9:19–21)

                      i.        Example: Paul at 1 Corinthians 2:2

           b.        Ministerial Use of Reason (See Isaiah 1:18; Matthew 22:36–38; Romans 12:2;1 Corinthians 2:16; 2 Corinthians 10:4–5; 1 Peter 3:15)

                      i.        Example: Paul at Mars Hill (Acts 17:22-34)

2.        Quick Review: Why Blame Adam?

           a.        Direct: Biblical/God’s Declaration: Genesis 3:17-19; Isaiah 43:27; Hosea 6:7; Job 31:33; Romans 5:12-19

           b.        Thoughtfulness (Mind of Christ): Breaking Adamic Covenant (Not Attending to God’s Word)

                      i.        God’s command given directly to Adam (Genesis 2:16-17)

                      ii.       Do not add: Deuteronomy 4:2 and 12:32; Proverbs 30:5-6; Revelation 22:18

                      iii.      Responsibilities of Adam and Eve to each other

3.        Opening Discussion (Thought Provokers): What do the following words mean? (How) Are the following words used in criticism of the Old Testament?

           a.        Misogyny

           b.        Patriarchy (Genesis 18:12; Exodus 21:3,17, 22; Lev. 12:2–5; Leviticus 22:13)

4.        What can be said in response to criticisms of the Old Testament that draw from (or point to) these words/concepts?

           a.        Misogyny

           b.        Patriarchy (Exod. 22:22; Deut. 10:18; 14:29; 24:17, 19)

5.        Equality of Adam and Eve: How and to what extent was Eve equal to Adam?

           a.        How did this equality between man and woman appear to change over time in the Old Testament?

                      i.        Commonly cited examples:

                                 (1)      Numbers 5:11-31 adultery trial (but see Numbers 5:2; 5:6; 6:2)

                                 (2)      Leviticus 12 purification after childbirth [40 days/80 days] (but see purification offering at Leviticus 12:6)

                                 (3)      Family name/lineage, leverite marriage (Deut 25:5-6)

                                 (4)      Legal capacity to contract (Numbers 30)

                                 (5)      Initiation of divorce (Deut 25:1-4; cf Matt. 19:7)

                      ii.       Compare: Parity/equality of men and women – Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:24; Exodus 20:12, 1:15; Deut. 5:16; 21:18–21; 27:16; Leviticus 19:3; Proverbs 6:20; Proverbs 18:22; Proverbs 19:26; Proverbs 23:25; Song of Songs 6:3, 7:10.

                      iii.      Compare: Strong women and influential women in the Old Testament: Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Rachel, Leah, and Tamar (all in Genesis); the Hebrew midwives Shiphrah and Puah (Exod. 1); the Egyptian princess (Exod. 2); Miriam and Jethro’s seven daughters, including Zipporah, Moses’s wife (Exod. 2, 4, 15); the daughters of Zelophehad (Num. 27); Deborah, Ruth, Naomi, Abigail, and Bathsheba (Judg. 4–5; Ruth 1–4; 1 Sam. 25; 1 Kings 1–2); and the Proverbs 31 woman.

                      iv.      Some other examples:

                                 (1)      Purity laws: Men (Lev. 15:16–18, 32; 22:4; Deut. 23:10)

                                 (2)      Laws addressing incest and adultery: Leviticus 18, 20

           b.        How are divorce and polygomy addressed in the Old Testament and, by comparison, in the New Testament? (Matt. 19:3-9; 1 Cor. 6:16; Eph. 5:31)

           c.        How does the New Testament elevate the status and role of women?

                      i.        E.g., Resurrection (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1; Luke 23:55-24:5; John 20:1)

6.        What is the difference between “authority” and “responsibility”?

           a.        Which stems from (or emerges from, or is dependent upon) the other?

           b.        From a Biblical perspective, which is greater? (Genesis 3)

7.        How is the importance of individual responsibility for our own actions highlighted:

           a.        In the Old Testament (See Leviticus 20:24, 19:2-6; Deut. 26:16-19)

           b.        In the New Testament

8.        What is the ultimate responsibility of a follower of Christ?

9.        

           Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church

           
            Lesson Four

         Misogyny and Patriarchy

1.       Introduction: Thinking about thinking about God’s Word (What are we doing here?)

           a.        Magisterial Misuse of Reason (See Isaiah 55:8–9; Romans 9:19–21)

                      i.        Example: Paul at 1 Corinthians 2:2

           b.        Ministerial Use of Reason (See Isaiah 1:18; Matthew 22:36–38; Romans 12:2;1 Corinthians 2:16; 2 Corinthians 10:4–5; 1 Peter 3:15)

                      i.        Example: Paul at Mars Hill (Acts 17:22-34)

2.        Quick Review: Why Blame Adam?

           a.        Direct: Biblical/God’s Declaration: Genesis 3:17-19; Isaiah 43:27; Hosea 6:7; Job 31:33; Romans 5:12-19

           b.        Thoughtfulness (Mind of Christ): Breaking Adamic Covenant (Not Attending to God’s Word)

                      i.        God’s command given directly to Adam (Genesis 2:16-17)

                      ii.       Do not add: Deuteronomy 4:2 and 12:32; Proverbs 30:5-6; Revelation 22:18

                      iii.      Responsibilities of Adam and Eve to each other

3.        Opening Discussion (Thought Provokers): What do the following words mean? (How) Are the following words used in criticism of the Old Testament?

           a.        Misogyny

           b.        Patriarchy (Genesis 18:12; Exodus 21:3,17, 22; Lev. 12:2–5; Leviticus 22:13)

4.        What can be said in response to criticisms of the Old Testament that draw from (or point to) these words/concepts?

           a.        Misogyny

           b.        Patriarchy (Exod. 22:22; Deut. 10:18; 14:29; 24:17, 19)

5.        Equality of Adam and Eve: How and to what extent was Eve equal to Adam?

           a.        How did this equality between man and woman appear to change over time in the Old Testament?

                      i.        Commonly cited examples:

                                 (1)      Numbers 5:11-31 adultery trial (but see Numbers 5:2; 5:6; 6:2)

                                 (2)      Leviticus 12 purification after childbirth [40 days/80 days] (but see purification offering at Leviticus 12:6)

                                 (3)      Family name/lineage, leverite marriage (Deut 25:5-6)

                                 (4)      Legal capacity to contract (Numbers 30)

                                 (5)      Initiation of divorce (Deut 25:1-4; cf Matt. 19:7)

                      ii.       Compare: Parity/equality of men and women – Genesis 1:27; Genesis 2:24; Exodus 20:12, 1:15; Deut. 5:16; 21:18–21; 27:16; Leviticus 19:3; Proverbs 6:20; Proverbs 18:22; Proverbs 19:26; Proverbs 23:25; Song of Songs 6:3, 7:10.

                      iii.      Compare: Strong women and influential women in the Old Testament: Sarah, Hagar, Rebekah, Rachel, Leah, and Tamar (all in Genesis); the Hebrew midwives Shiphrah and Puah (Exod. 1); the Egyptian princess (Exod. 2); Miriam and Jethro’s seven daughters, including Zipporah, Moses’s wife (Exod. 2, 4, 15); the daughters of Zelophehad (Num. 27); Deborah, Ruth, Naomi, Abigail, and Bathsheba (Judg. 4–5; Ruth 1–4; 1 Sam. 25; 1 Kings 1–2); and the Proverbs 31 woman.

                      iv.      Some other examples:

                                 (1)      Purity laws: Men (Lev. 15:16–18, 32; 22:4; Deut. 23:10)

                                 (2)      Laws addressing incest and adultery: Leviticus 18, 20

           b.        How are divorce and polygomy addressed in the Old Testament and, by comparison, in the New Testament? (Matt. 19:3-9; 1 Cor. 6:16; Eph. 5:31)

           c.        How does the New Testament elevate the status and role of women?

                      i.        E.g., Resurrection (Matthew 28:1; Mark 16:1; Luke 23:55-24:5; John 20:1)

6.        What is the difference between “authority” and “responsibility”?

           a.        Which stems from (or emerges from, or is dependent upon) the other?

           b.        From a Biblical perspective, which is greater? (Genesis 3)

7.        How is the importance of individual responsibility for our own actions highlighted:

           a.        In the Old Testament (See Leviticus 20:24, 19:2-6; Deut. 26:16-19)

           b.        In the New Testament

8.        What is the ultimate responsibility of a follower of Christ?

9.        How are we also responsible for nurturing and attending to the flourishing of (church, family) as followers of Christ?

10.      Conclusion / Closing Prayer: Psalm 119:121-128

10.      Conclusion / Closing Prayer: Psalm 119:121-128

The First Adam

July 26, 2019
Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church

Lesson Three                                             

The First Adam

         •        Acts 17:26

         •        Romans 5:14-18

         •        1 Corinthians 15:22

         •        2 Timothy 1:14

1.       Opening Discussion (Thought Provokers):

          a.       Did the serpent have legs? Genesis 3:14

          b.       Did Eve lie about God’s command? Genesis 3:3

          c.       Was Adam a wimp? Genesis 3:6

          d.       Was Adam totally depraved?

          e.       If Eve ate the fruit first, why does Adam get all the blame? (Isaiah 43:27; Hosea 6:7; Job 31:33; James 1:14-15)

2.       Quick Review: Heaven + earth = everything (entire cosmos): the majesty of Who God is.

          a.       Genesis 1 – The Vertical (God’s-eye, majestic, heavenly) viewpoint [H430elohiym] of the “what” of creation

          b.       Genesis 2: The Horizontal (Human story-of-redemption perspective, earthly) viewpoint of the “why” of creation

                    i.        [H3068 Yehovah H430elohiym ] links the idea of the pre-garden Creator-God with the post-Garden story of covenant and redemption.

3.       Genesis 3: God’s interaction with humans

          a.       Pattern/framework of interaction: “Covenant”

                    i.        Solemn agreement backed up by God’s promise: “An absolute agreement between distinct persons, about the order and dispensing of things in their power, unto their mutual concern and advantage” (John Owen)

                    ii.       Not quid pro quo or the result of negotiation

                    iii.      Two (and only two) categories of covenants are possible between God and humans

                              (1)     Covenant of works founded upon what we shall do for salvation

                              (2)     Covenant of grace founded upon what God shall do for us to save us

          b.       Adamic Covenant (covenant of works; covenant of creation),: Genesis 2:16-17

                    i.        “The distance between God and the Creature is so great, that although reasonable Creatures do owe obedience unto him as their Creator, yet they could never have attained the reward of Life, but by some voluntary condescension on God’s part, which he hath been pleased to express, by way of Covenant” (Baptist Confession of Faith (1689), ¶7.1)

                    ii.       The Potter’s right to impose requirements upon the clay: disobedience would render the creation liable to punishment/extinction, but obedience would not engender the right of any reward

                    iii.      The LORD God revealed Himself not only as Sovereign, Creator and Lawgiver, but also as loving Father who graciously established a covenant relationship with Adam as representative head of the human race.

                    iv.      The LORD God, as author of the Adamic covenant (covenant of works, or covenant of creation) promised eternal life in the way of obedience, enabling Adam to obtain eternal life for himself and his descendants (Romans 7:10). See also Lev. 18:5; Ezek. 20:11-13, Ezek. 20:20; Luke 10:28; Rom. 10:5; Gal. 3:12.

          c.       Compare: The Everlasting Covenant (Isaiah 55:3; Luke 22:22; John 6:38-39; Ephesians 3:11; Ephesians 1:3-6; Hebrews 13:20; Revelation 13:8)

                    i.        The Father promising to bring to the Son all whom the Father had given Him (John 6:39; John 17:9; John 17:24).

                              (1)     The Son would become man (Col. 2:9; 1 Tim. 2:5), become for a while lower than the angels (Heb. 2:7), and be found under the Law (Gal. 4:4-5).

                              (2)     The Son would die for the sins of the world (1 John 2:2; 1 Pet. 2:24), and the Father would raise the Son from the Dead (Psalm 2).

                    ii.       First publication of the Everlasting Covenant: Genesis 3:15

4.       Conclusion

          a.       Christ as the “yes” of God’s covenantal relationship (2 Corinthians 1:20; Luke 22:40)                              

          b.       Christ as the first and only covenant-keeper on the human side (1 Corinthians 15:45) and on God’s side (Romans 5:8)

5.       Closing Prayer: Psalm 119:113-120

Creation Accounts for Everything

July 19, 2019
Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey Series in the Koinonia Adult Bible Fellowship (ABF) at Cornerstone Baptist Church

Lesson Two

Creation Accounts for Everything

  1. Opening Discussion – “Getting” Unbelievers (Meaning of life and living for/against nature):
    1. How do people who do not believe in creation make sense of the world and of life?
    2. How do people who do not believe in creation deal with the beauty and cruelty of nature?
    3. How do they deal with “the problem of life”? (e.g., Job 4:12-21)
  2. Starting (Startling) Point – Unique features of Genesis 1 and 2: Creation…
    1. Was and is accomplished by an eternal God: Psalm 90:2
    2. Was and is from nothing – Ex nihilo [H1254 bara’]: Jeremiah 10:16; Isaiah 44:24
    3. Was and is Personal and ongoing – John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:15-17; Hebrews 11:3
    4. Was and is subject to God’s laws – God is the Lawgiver of physical laws (Psalm 33:6-9; John 1:1-3; Colossians 1:16-17; Hebrews 1:3)
  3. God is the Creater and source of time, space, energy, matter and … light (Rev, 21:23; Rev. 22:5)
  4. Genesis Accounts for Everything (i.e., heaven and earth: Genesis 14:19; Genesis 14:22; Jeremiah 23:24; 2 Kings 19:15; 2 Chronicles 2:12; Psalms 115:15, 121:2, 124:8, 134:3, 146:6; Isaiah 37:16)
  5. Genesis 1: The Vertical (God’s-eye, majestic) viewpoint [H430elohiym] of the “what” of creation
    1. The mysteries of light, energy, matter and mass.
    2. God’s majesty, omniscience, creativity, love, orderliness and timeliness
      1. Mapping our lives to God’s rhythm of work and rest (Exodus 20:11; Exodus 34:21)
    3. Heaven + earth = everything (entire cosmos): the majesty of Who God is.
  6. Genesis 2: The Horizontal (Human story-of-redemption perspective) viewpoint of the “why” of creation
    1. [H3068 Yehovah H430elohiym ] links the idea of the pre-garden Creator-God with the post-Garden story of covenant and redemption.
    2. Genesis 1:3 Light before the Genesis 1:16 Sun?
      1. “The fact that Genesis talks about light existing before the appearance of the sun, moon, and stars seem rather to be evidence of divine authorship of the Bible. It was inconceivable to pagan thinking that life could exist without the sun and its light. Hence pagan religions worshiped the sun as the source of light and heat . . . The Bible is unique in stating that the sun is of secondary importance.” (Donald Chittick, The Controversy, Portland, Oregon: Multnomah Press, 1984, p. 151)
    3. Genesis 1:11-12 Plants before Genesis 2:5 shrubs [H7880 siyach] and cultivated crops [H6212 `eseb] of the field?
      1. Desert vegetation after a rain (Gen 2:5; Gen 21:15; Job 30:4l; Job 30:7)
    4. Animals on the fifth day (Genesis 1:20-25) or sixth day (Genesis 2:19)?
      1. Pluperfect “had” formed [H3335 yatsar], and now presented [H935 bow’].
  7. Eve and the (very long?) sixth day? “A little help??!!”
      1. God’s orderly presentation of animals and Adam’s job of naming kinds (Genesis 6:20).
      2. Tension for Adam: the LORD’s first observation of what is not good (and the LORD’s problem-solving gift).
  8. Q & A and Closing Discussion about “wasted space”
      1. The countryside? Deserts? The cosmos? You?
      2. Compare: Psalm 19:1
  9. Conclusion
  10. Closing Prayer: Psalm 119:105-112